Where Is God: Are the Gaps Shrinking?

For the faithful, without doubt, the Christian God has operated in the earthly realm. God generated the famous burning bush of Moses, parted the Red Sea, created the virgin birth of Christ, turned water into wine, converted fishes and loaves to feed thousands, rose from the dead and ascended into heaven.

That presence continues today. Today, for the faithful, God touches our earthly realm as his listens to our prayers, sends his Spirit to guide and purify us, inspires the bishops at ecumenical councils, and enables modern day saints to perform miracles.

But where is this God?

Before the ascendancy of modern science, the Christian God could be present “out there” in nature. Humanity’s understanding of science was sufficiently limited that we could picture our God as residing in the skies above, wielding the forces of nature for his purposes. Ample gaps existed in our science to allow the earthly attributes of God, and his presence in our earthly realm, to slip in without contradiction of science.

But the God of earthly prowess is running out of room to hide. Physics over the last century has drilled down to the infinitesimally small, and the sister science of astronomy has peered out to the extraordinary distant. The “out there” is shrinking.

So where is God? One might have thought we would run into him, if he was “out there” in the physical realm.

One Approach, Denial of God – This contradiction, this incongruity, between the professed earthly presence and intervention of God, and the increasing scope and reach of science, leads many to a denial of God. If one takes our hard sciences, and adds in sociology, psychology and anthropology, one can readily create a convincing logic that God isn’t a reality but rather a figment of collective human need and imagination.

Many prominent authors have written books to that effect.

Believers, the faithful, would reject that rejection, and despite any contradictions maintain a conviction in God. I accept that as reasonable, that at the person-on-the-street level, faith can operate as such. In the myriad of inconsistencies in life, we cannot expect everyone to resolve them all with absolute philosophical and theological rigor. It is permissible to just believe.

But for truth, for that which would supersede all else, we cannot overlook such contradictions. If God is to remain a possibility within truth we must resolve the increasing tension between our personified and intervening God, and the lack of any physical indication of his presence or the mechanism of his intervention.

Why work so conscientiously to maintain what some would consider a mirage. Very simply, within our history, within our culture, and within our conceptual realm, God stands as too central of an idea to simply abandon it without due diligence.

Of God and Concepts – The origins of most religions occurred before the scientific age. That timing stands as a key insight into our dilemma. God could reveal himself only within the conceptual framework of pre-scientific mankind. This limitation extended to other spiritual concepts. Souls, heavens, salvation, grace, all became cast within the terminology and idioms of the times.

Our quandary of the shrinking gaps for God may rest not so much in the essence of God, but in our images of that essence. God is ineffable (let us assume he exists, and if he exists most theology posits God as ineffable, at least within current human intellectual capabilities). As such, we can grasp God only by images and analogies, and difficulties with God could readily be in those images and analogies, not in the nature of God himself.

To explore that hypothesis, let’s think about how God would design the method and content of revelation to match what mankind could most readily understand. How would he market himself, in a good sense, i.e. without attempting to deceive while maximizing his message?

Now without being presumptuous, I would posit God would want to achieve the following in a revelation:

– Show knowledge or abilities beyond mankind’s
– Maintain credibility
– Demonstrate his munificence, divinity and perfection
– Fit within the culture of the time
– Impart new understandings

In prior times, converting water-to-wine (or just a story of converting water to wine) worked within those parameters. Nature in those times contained numerous mysteries; the forces of nature brought both good fortune and calamity with a certain degree of arbitrariness. Water-to-wine fit into the general unexplainable phenomena encompassing life in general.

Today, water-to-wine might work, but I could readily conceive this event becoming swallowed within modern culture. The miracle could be demoted to just another Wikipedia article, with categories of description, scientific explanations, historic context, socio-political impacts, press coverage and book deals, all highly referenced. Our modern culture tends to chew up such physically bounded “miraculous” events.

Current prophet – If a revelation were to occur in current times, God would likely not use images, messages and approaches relevant for a prior time. The criteria for his revelation, as listed in the bullets above, would remain the same, but that criteria would dictate different approaches.

So how would a current prophet implement the criteria above with a current approach? Let me lay out how such a prophet might operate.

The prophet would appear first in a deep African village, to a small group of people, but including one person who posts a video on the internet. The prophet would proclaim “all gods are in God.” He would show a tattoo and a talisman, and provide a dental impression, suitably encased for sanitary and preservation purposes, then disappear.

Few would notice. The prophet the next day would appear at a vastly different location, at a great telescope in South America, to another small group of people, again including one who posts a video on the internet. The prophet would write down detailed co-ordinates for locating a planet, and proclaim “you will find life.” He would show his tattoo, his talisman, and leave a dental impression.

The prophet on the third day would again appear at a new and different location, at CERN, in a room with no other occupants at the time. He would gain access to the computer systems, enter an algorithm and write “with this you find an essence for time.” He would leave a dental impression.

The next day, the scientists of CERN discover the entered algorithm, and trigger a local press story. No one, however, can find a trace of how this person arrived or left the building or location.

The prophet on the fourth day arrives in a Southeast Asian village. He asks the local doctor to take a sample of blood, shows his tattoo and talisman, and leaves the now familiar dental sample. The doctor records a short video, and posts it. The prophet proclaims that the blood contains “a cure and revelations.” The prophet’s story begins to break across the news media in sporadic reports. His dental impressions begin to be collected.

On the fifth day, the prophet appears at the Antarctic South Pole station. A video is taken, with shots of the tattoo and talisman, and the dental impression provided. He proclaims, “maintain diligence, as five years will be required.” The prophet takes a small container of radioactive material used for experiments, steps outside into the cold, breaks open the radioactive container and douses himself. He then walks off.

The prophet is never seen again. No evidence of his means of transportation is ever found. No evidence of his body or the radioactivity is found in the Antarctic snow. The dental impressions all match, and the DNA on the impressions is found to be human.

Five year later, the planet at the telescope coordinates is found to contain plant-like life, the algorithm at CERN uncovers tachyon-like particles that revolutionize the concepts of time, and the blood sample contains cures to diseases, and proteins that when decoded provide divine sayings.

Discussion – What is this story? It is not an attempt to supplant God. Rather, the story indicates that the apparent closing of the gaps where God can exist is a closing of the God of the concepts available in the historic time of that revelation. The story points to possibilities for divine presence and revelation tuned to present culture.

We think science has closed the gaps. But the story shows many gaps exist. Mankind does not know if or where other life exists, physics has incomplete understanding of time, and medical science can not address major illness.

Some are skeptical of the resurrection of Christ. That skepticism could be considered culturally supported since the movie Sherlock Holmes showed how a mere human villain pulled off his own apparent resurrection. But in this story, teleportation replaces resurrection, with dental records as authentication, and though not iron clad we would not readily dismiss the power and reality of a prophet employing such a means of travel.

Teleportation vs. miracles shows how cultural appropriateness enables the credibility of revelation. Two millennium ago, communication and travel occurred so slow that the teleportation of the story here would hardly have been noticed. Today, that is of course much changed. The teleportation here is documented through internet technology and authenticated by scientific means not available in prior times. It receives credibility since science itself is exploring teleportation. Finally, the teleportation is sufficiently astounding to make explanation of it as a trick, or within know physics, difficult.

In today’s media-hyped environment, a prophet with a long duration could get exposed, destroyed, disputed, elevated, exploited, politicized or otherwise unable to stay on point. This story has a prophet of five days, with the revelation, not the prophet, extending over time.

And miracles are replaced by information. Our scientific age is skeptical of physically bounded miracles. Our belief in science is so strong that many would pick the now constancy of science over an isolated localized miracle of a prophet, if the two conflicted. Thus, while a physical miracle creates a contradiction with science, a prophet offering information does not. Information and science are conciliatory, and the information revealed here extends science.

Is the teleportation a similar physical miracle that would be discounted? Possibly, but I would argue it is sufficiently broad, and sufficiently beyond standard magician material, to set itself apart.

Where is God? – If he exists he is somewhere, I know not where. So I have asked a question which I can not answer. But I have offered that the continuing advances of science, and the expanding reach of modern culture, do not of necessity squeeze the “where” of God into a smaller and smaller gap.

Book Summary and Reflection – The Word Among Us Contextualizing Theology for Mission Today

A careful reading of the articles of the thirteen contributors reveals their conviction that contextualization [defined by Gilliland as “to simplify, clarify and give ownership of the Bible and the whole Gospel to the community of faith in a given place” (317)], is basically Bible-based and Holy Spirit-led. Consequently, it is a requirement for mission today. These contributors from the School of World Mission of Fuller Theological Seminary are committed “to understand mission with biblical clarity, cultural sensitivity and spiritual wholeness” (4). The book is divided into two parts which respectively contain six and eight articles.

Part 1 is the more theoretical section of the book which begins with a discussion of the meaning of contextualization and why it is a critical issue in mission today. The contextual principle begins with the first moment when the first message is preached and continues through the planting, nurturing and witnessing of the church. Chapters 2-4 demonstrate that contextualization is a biblical principle. Glasser opines that in the Old Testament, God always revealed whom He was in concrete ways from within the culture, utilizing human situations to make Himself known. Gilliland argues that the expansion of the gospel into the gentile world demanded new symbols of communication and careful attention to local situations while maintaining a consistent, essential gospel. Van Engen realistically observes that the covenant motif encompasses all of Scripture and that contextual relevance requires that the covenant have a contemporary contextual quality as it moves through history. Hiebert aptly notes that it is essential to understand that contextualization is a complex process involving the careful use of cultural forms to convey Christian meanings. The ultimate article in this chapter from Kraft discusses how God works at the deep levels of human receptivity making His Word known through dynamic channels of communication.

Shaw opens Part Two by reviewing factors of both biblical and modern contexts which impact the translation of biblical texts. In the discussion on dimensions of approaches to contextual communication, Sogaard analyses how the whole area of communication and all the technical facilities available will produce results only if the whole context contributes to strategic methods. Clinton agrees that the discovery of leaders who are culturally authentic as well as spiritually gifted is a critical process in which the base and applicational contexts interface in determining appropriate leadership. Approaches to development, Elliston argues, must understand the specific human situation and find solutions that are truly Christian as well as functional. Wagner presents a logical argument that the uniqueness of people and the specialty of social groupings must be accepted and utilized for theologizing to take place. The neglected area of Christian nominalism is discussed by Gibbs who calls for an intense study of historical and contemporary issues that contribute to the problem. The last two chapters by Tan and Woodberry deal with specific cultural settings. The former, demonstrated in the Chinese setting, observes that one methodology for contextualization is to highlight cultural themes or problems and deal with them in a biblical way. The latter is a challenge of the Muslim world. When Muslims become Christians and continue to use Muslim forms, Woodberry observes that they are readopting old Jewish and Christian forms of worship.

Reflection

The text has given the researcher a better understanding of the meaning and necessity of contextualizing the Bible in a very relevant way for a particular culture. In the Old Testament, God Himself used the widely known, ancient phenomenon of covenant. The ministry of Paul for instance provides a very clear case study for contextualization in the New Testament. The central message of Jesus was carefully retained, while as the Spirit directed, this message was given incarnational expression. Paul worked with a variety of local situations with no text other than the Old Testament. In theologizing today, as we move from culture to culture, we have the Scriptures. Revelational truth should therefore be the foundation on which particular theologies are constructed. We must know the Word and the culture. The hermeneutic of the culture will guide us in appropriating the Word, while at the same time the irrevocable truth of the Word will judge and transform the culture.

The very high quality of the articles is attributed to the fact that they are coming from thirteen specialists with doctorate degrees in various shades of missions. The detailed index (author and subject), extensive bibliography with over four hundred and forty five references, and twenty-five figures or illustrations enhance the quality of the text.

A query with the editor is in the way the appendix is treated as an optional extra when it should have formed part of the main text since the models discussed (anthropological, translation, praxis, adaptation, synthetic, semiotic and critical) are critically analysed and relevant to any interpretation of one’s culture.

The above notwithstanding, this invaluable text is a must for every Christian who wants to be faithful to presenting the good news of Jesus Christ truly and in a way that the Lord’s claims are understood.

(c) Oliver Harding 2008

The Manticore of Sumer [The Second Soul of Queen Shub-ad] Chapters: 1-4; reedited

Advance: The clay tablet of Sumer was made under the third dynasty of Ur, during a time of Mesopotamian bureaucracy and record keeping. Ur was a city-state of Sumer, and a sumerologist had found among its ruins several hundred such clay tablets. The tablets in question reflected the careful and detailed administration of diverse functions in the kingdom, especially the sacrifices, and this particular one about a treasure hidden in a canal at Ur. Clearly the cuneiform script told of the exact location. It was a small neat script, but an outstanding specimen of cuneiform calligraphy thought the good professor who found it (from Troy University); it was often the scribes job to take several small ones and combine them into an individual account, but this one was a single one, larger than the others, yet small for a big hand; it didn’t have to cover a whole years harvest as many did only a tressure. And this is where the story begins:

Chapter One
Patience from the City

Life as we all know, is bitter-sweet, and once done, once said, so it is for eternity; wipe it off the scrolls or tell the jury to overlook it, once done, it is done. There was no June sun in Lima, Peru, cool shady clouds seeping from the ocean inward, sitting over the city like fingers hanging down, likened to a canopy, willow branches. The water from the ocean looked like a green transparent mountain. I stood up on the rocky formation by the coast. The great world beyond troubled me, disturbed my joyfulness, my father had passed on, died a blissful solitude death. I stood there looking out into the ocean as if I was summoning it up, half dreamy; loneliness had seeped into me, sadness, and undertones of it: once more the wisdom of my father struck me, and all the years he laid it upon me. ‘I doubt man will ever find but a few moments on earth of perfect rest,’ Endlessly my father’s will and these words came to mind. He had large academia of them. Next, came the sounds of the hissing sea that flooded my brain like an engine overworking.

I was well accustomed to my little house in Miraflores, Lima, Peru, but my father persuaded often me to be by his side in Huancayo, beyond the Andes a few hundred miles away. The noise of the sea, too imperative to be ignored, assured me of why dad wanted to have his office in the Navados, behind the city–the ceaseless sounding city of Lima; stress free I do believe for him, as Huancayo offered, and became his objective.

Chapter Two
The Lower World of Sumer

“Now, as the Golden Cuneiform Clay Tablet (so it came to be known as), it was the gemstone of Sumer! This he clearly regarded as the utmost of his riches. On it was engraved a code, which the old professor could only read.

“In the old Sumerian belief it was held that there were gods that were once kings of Sumer (superhuman beings; angelic renegades), and they hid a treasure–but more important, the method used in writing (or speaking) as indicated on the tablets were most important, it could command the old demigods of the underworld to appear, should one go through a ritual.

On the tablet, which, as you know now, is carved into the image of a square of sorts, both sides are cultivated with such words. As he had told folks about this: he’d often rise and pace the floor. A great fear for him was to lose this treasure; but I was in some strange way relieved when Simon gave me, just before he died–gave me the tablet. The day he died he was calm and placid. I said very little to him that day, but waited as he asked, then suddenly, out of nowhere he gave me the tablet.

If there had been any possibility of danger to him, or me he had shown none to be present at the time. Mr. Anticuario, my father, returned home late that evening, he resumed his seat as usual in the living room; he placed before me the tablet. I leaned forward as he showed it to me.

On a lining of purple satin, it lay as if it was a ruby, almost as big as the palm of my Gloxinia hand (Jack’s girlfriend). He did something to it; it was not its natural shape, carved it perhaps. Not sure what tool he used. Blood was stained on a corner of it, the colour of blood that is.

I’m sure this could not be a mistake to anyone consciously looking at the tablet: on it the figures were plain, cut with exquisite precision, as he had told me they were long ago, I used a magnifying glass to search it out, one that my father took from his jacket pocket.

When I had fully seen it, He turned it over so it rested on its back, where half the tablet was blank. The reverse was no less wonderful than the other side, just half blank, and you could see it was carved more as if it was cut into the clay. He resumed to speak to me about its legend, its powers, and its treasure:

“You see, the marks, or symbols on the upper part of the tablet, compose the amount of the treasure, with its determinatives. You know, or you all should know I suppose, that Sumerian culture used marks, dashes, lines and so forth of “thought”; they didn’t use papyrus as did the Egyptians. On the other side of the clay tablet, is the prayer, or summons to the demigods of the lower world, its chant:

“It may be beyond belief, but it is true nonetheless, the old wonder-workers knew the truth about the lower world. My father smiled at me often, lovingly, when he spoke about this, and then he’d resume”

“We need of course a spirit filled heart, or in plain English, ‘patience,’ will do. So in other words, this stone, or clay tablet has an element to control the Lower Ancient World of Sumer, or at least to summons them for assistance, a porthole for them to fly through you could say; and a horde of gold, or perhaps jewels hidden in some canal in Ur.

My father closed the box he had stored it in, and gave it to me with the tablet in it, and went to his room. When he was to return he was to resume his conversation with me, but I knew what it was going to be about, he had done this several times before, perhaps so I wouldn’t forget, or perhaps so he wouldn’t, he’d seat himself right here, at this table and he’d go on:

“That tablet, has a mystic chant written into it (in the centre of it is the finishing lines; which only can be gotten to by opening it up, and in its hollow centre you will also find–along with the end lines to the chant–something called a drifting soul; King Gilgamish, used this chant himself, used it to subdue the kingdoms around him with. That is to say, in one case, when he had fought against Kish (in present day Iraq, city dating back to before the Great Flood, he used his influence with the Lower World, they assisted him, and the city fell quickly into his hands. And then he rebuilt the city, with the demigods help. In my father’s words ‘I need to work out the chant and the act of this source of resurrection.’ That is to say, he wanted to be able to summons the Lower World, a control element here, and perhaps a power instinct I realize. I kept the Tablet within a safe place after he died, whence no one could find it; trichologists, or friends of his to be exact, not even the museum inspectors could find it.”

Three Souls

“His ‘cosmological body’? What do you mean, by cosmological? Jack. What does it indicated?” There was heaviness in Gloxinia’s voice. As she had asked that question which surprised me a little, my girlfriend; but my father would have smiled at it so I did, and accepted it as a sort of tolerant parental gesture, it kind of pushed its way out through her sunshine face; then I spoke:

“Ah yes, the cosmological body, subsequent to the time I speak of, which is an accepted fact of modern theology, anthropology, in Sumer, which had its rise with gifted individuals, each king had to perform an unthinkable task (unthinkable for normal human being that is), of having thirty to fifty organism with the temple priestess, these kings were of course demigods, had to be, as was Gilgamish, and his forefathers. Thus, at will they could climax forever you might say: to a woman, a wish come true, to a normal human being who is married to a female receiver, a nightmare, should the king ask for her any certain evening; she surely would never forget the evening. In essence, they were irresistible you might say. But as I was about to say, my father’s cosmological body, what did I mean by saying that was just this: he could transfer his body whithersoever he chose, by this disbanding and reincarnation of atom brake up. And as a result, he chose to visit the underworld, the Lower world, as you may call it my lovely Gloxinia. But he was never capable in finding neither the treasure nor the chant to summons Hell’s best–the end part that is. He feared to open the clay table, saying in essence: it would be his end, and perhaps that is what brought on the heart attack, he cracked the seams of the tablet as you all can see: who is to say for sure. I myself have the capability of referring my body, but not in particles, like my father. He did it by the way of ancient beliefs, believing in three souls, and magical chants.

“Each soul possessed an absolutely independent existence. Free to move at its own will, it can enter into the heaven of God, or the Hell of Lucifer, or converse with the gods, the demons of the Underworld, of before the Great Flood. This is the first soul. The second, has substance and form, and can become animalistic in nature, or not; it has power to leave its abode, when you die, it can even leave the tomb, and come back, visit or revisit the old places it left, like a ghost…even talk with the old souls, the other souls, or loved ones. Then there was the third soul, spiritual intelligence or spirit filled. It had light; untouchable light and shape, the shape of the body…(the pious element of the makeup I do believe) we must not forget we still have the man himself, and his power and strength; thus, now making him complete. And to add to this, was the shadow that went with the body attached to the heart, where all life comes and goes.

“Henceforward, with all this in mind, and my father accepting this as fact, and he did, there are many possibilities: and let me stress, he did also have an unimpressionable will to go along with this. He often told me when he looked into water he could see his image wherever he was thinking of being, at that point, should he will any soul of his, or part of his soul, to go there, it would; and should he will his whole being and all its forces to collaborate, it would be personified, and he would not be displeased where he’d end up–complete. That said, genetically speaking, he was a ting supernatural, you need only ask Shub-ad, she knows, he lasted sexually with her–so he said twenty-times.

Chapter three
To the Lower World’s Secrets

My father went to the Underworld to find out about the pre-Sumerians in particular the chant and the treasure, and he was told by Queen Shub-AD herself ((first soul ((Shub-ad: had many human sacrifices lavished on her, in the bottom of her grave pit it was crowed with bones, butchered where they stood; also in the tomb was silver cow’s heads, a pair of silver heads of lionesses, all striking in its craftsmanship, and imagination: and of course the first triangular harp; discovered at Ur, 2500 BC), whom came back and told me, me in so many words, ‘…there were migrates in this land called Sumer until it was sufficiently formed to offer reasonable agriculture and competence, nomads who moved from one place to another, looking for fertile soil, so it appeared. Mankind then was created for breeding (so it seemed), eating, having a few worn garments, they walked with limbs on the ground, they ate herbs with their mouths like sheep, they drank water wherever they could find it…’ so he said, she said. A part of her soul was left to linger the earth, he found it, another part in the Underworld, the third part encased in the centre of this tablet, with the chant. We of course are talking about the second soul of Shub-ad.

“He also told me, the animal soul of Shub-ad, was locked up in a vault of the hollow of the clay tablet, whom can lead you to the treasure.

“What really took place was this, or so I have come to this conclusion that: the Queen wanted to resurrect her first soul with her second and third, thus a full resurrection, and my father was to help in this, and in the process, she gave him a terrible extension of magic, its power killed him, her second soul did the work, it was locked up so long that when it got free through the cracks of the tablet and the partial chant, it turned into its animalistic form, I believe a Manticore of some sort, a female lion’s body of some type, with her hands as paws, iron looking sabre tooth monster, and attacked my father. When he died he had looked chew over: every colour under the sun, he was: choked up purple, read blood all over him, green and yellow skin, nothing on him was a normal colour. Whatever magical formula he used, it gave life to the creature, which was then transmitted. If she now connects with her third soul, the soul of light, it could have a positive effect; should it not it will run ramped; should they all connect, it is unpredictable. So I have to choose between learning the chant in the tablet, reading the scripture on the tablet, and hoping to find the treasure, and an unfastened mad animalistic soul, in the form of a ghost.

This soul that is free from the god’s, and wanders the earth until the end of time will not go willingly. There need be no limits to her objectives. It is my belief she laid dormient for all these centuries in the tablet tomb, waiting for my father to set her free–or anybody for that matter–and he did. So the chant is mixed with her guarding it. But no matter what she is, she is gone, the chant is free for us to seek and inspect–perhaps only a part of the chant is available, or none within its tablet vaults, and the world, the demonic world would help us once we acquired this full chant? If indeed she is gone, and if so, perhaps the end part of the chant is also. Her first soul remains in the underworld–I know that for sure. What her intentions are we know not, but her first soul, in the underworld would have some kind of instinct to her next moves–should we seek and ask, if indeed that is possible; we or they could even communicate by dreams.

“Should we find her grave, that in itself would be a central point of contact, now comes the crown of the issue, the purpose of our acquiring or attacking her: that immense tressure left in some hidden place in the canal of Ur, she would know; plus, once having influence over the demonic world–if indeed that is possible, we could help connect all three souls together, she’d once more be a living queen on earth, 4500-years old, with a body and soul intact; a great scientific achievement that I’d not want to boast unless I could harness her. (All six guests at the table sat emotionless, doubt and darkness in their eyes; a mummied look.) To this end, we seek the Queen, use her body to summons the souls that wonder the earth, linger in the Underworld. For years I suspected my father of this, having access to the Nether World, I thought was not real, though it is. I was patient, and waited to gather all the facts from my father, and his teachings. And now I have many of those facts and options to look at.

Chapter Four
The Sumerian Hymn

“It was the second soul of the Queen that took the Sumerian Hymn, the chant,” I had told the group, and Florencia had asked about the resurrection, ‘…is there not but one resurrection! I mean that is what the Bible says?’ And my answer was as is, for a human, it was final, one resurrection of the body and soul; but in the uncommon world, the spirit world, the supernatural realm, there are plenty of deep-rooted dawns or horizons, a magical spell can sweep across great landmasses, or rivers, and inspire silence of a dead soul to life: who knows what is possible.

“It thus, is given to me to comprehend what is to be and far-thinking and what to do with this high-souled woman of antiquity, that paces the earth as a Manticore, ready to devour whomever, however, whenever: who holds perhaps my secret, if not many secrets of treasures and the underworld.

“I don’t expect Queen Shub-ad’s spirit (animalistic soul) to come willingly, lest we convince her the connecting of her other two will make her whole, for every woman would like a second chance under the sun to find love, is this not in a woman’s heart to do so. No matter what has happened before or after, a woman’s heart is never sealed for love.

We must be very careful, for you surely we all know this was a woman who could raise an army with the wave of her hand, or have a temple built with the nudge of her beautiful head. Times of old may be gone, but they are not forgotten for those who have lived them, and I’m sure pleasure to restore is in the making.”

“I fear–I fear such a capture could be our deaths!!” Said Manual Zipida, sitting at the table across from Gloxinia, Mary and Florencia. As he spoke he seemed to be stirred, his eyes had a cryptic look in them, no mortal sight. And then the eyes filled up with shed tears of great emotion. The very soul of a woman we were going to try and capture, take it and try to harness it, consequently, he sat back shook his head and listened, entrenched into his chair, as if to say: what do we do with it if we get it? “I can see her with my second sight, she is very alone, in a silent temple in Ur, dreaming of something, she has the tale of the Manticore, the great saber teeth of the ancient lions, and great paws, a beautiful head. The land under is calling her, but she fears to go to it. She sees us, as she hides from the sweet winds and cool agitated desert air. Perhaps I can be her kindred spirit, someone kindred anyhow, like her own, we maybe can merge for a moment, long enough to find out what her intentions are and what she’s done thus far.”

We all sat silent as Manual sought his powerful interpretation of her purpose, the loftiness other thoughts. It seemed out of his mouth came a flowing of a musical cadence, even his tone was strange: I could read his mind, and he was reading the Queens soul’s thoughts, in its nature it sought its other souls, as a mother to its daughters, the rest of the feeling captured was of hope. Her soul was trying to tunnel its way through the gloomy temples and caverns of the death. And I asked Manual, ‘what was she doing now besides the communion seeking of her other souls: soul-to-soul, so their breaths could mingle in the same air, that is what she seeks, and some other hidden agenda I can’t make out, but I see you in it.’ She was now at the pantheon of the Sumerian gods. Her noble prayers, chants were a vibrant musical cadence of some kind of internal force, likened to a great instrument that summons a deeper power. But what had she down since her release two weeks ago? That was weighing on my mind?